Reader’s Nook: Eric Kariuki

Kerry’s Note: This week in the Reader’s Nook,  I am thrilled to be hosting to be hosting my good friend, Eric Kariuki whom I  have known for a quite a number of years now. One of the words that immediately comes to mind, whenever I am asked to describe him, is intellectually curious. I have learnt something new or gained a different perspective from him on various issues. Well,  I hope that you will also learn a thing or two from him. Don’t forget to reach out to him in the comments section below or TwitterKerry’s Note: This week in the Reader’s Nook,  I am thrilled to be hosting to be hosting my good friend, Eric Kariuki whom I  have known for a quite a number of years now. One of the words that immediately comes to mind, whenever I am asked to describe him, is intellectually curious. I have learnt something new or gained a different perspective from him on various issues. Well,  I hope that you will also learn a thing or two from him. Don’t forget to reach out to him in the comments section below or Twitter

Please introduce yourself and tell us a bit about your reading habits/ reading journey.

eric

I am Eric Kariuki; an avid reader, hiker and cultural traveller. I enjoy exploring new spaces whether in the literary or cultural world since it always clarifies and deepens my understanding of life and the world in general. I am what you would call an eclectic reader. I enjoy having diverse reading tastes because I believe the world is a colourful place full of character. I try to read at least 2 books a month and for the most part manage but I am always engrossed in an article, short story or report everyday on my phone or tablet.

Which books are currently in your backpack (manbag)?

A Widow for One Year by John Irving

Which book do you read at least once a year?

Making choices: Practical Wisdom for Everyday Moral Decisions by Peter Kreeft

What makes you love a book?

Good character development, great plot and pacing, a subtle and metaphorical way of characterising situations and dialogue.

Which was the last book that you read out of your comfort zone?

War and Peace

What is your earliest book-related memory? River and the Source by Margaret Ogola in primary school. I used to love those African books

Name a case in which hype ruined your reading experience? Not had one yet.

In your view, what is the most disappointing book-film adaptation?

Harry Potter  and the Deathly Hallows

How do you feel about giving books bad/negative reviews?

If a book is bad, it is bad. I am happy to provide a constructive opinion on it.

In light of the recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, The Washington Post published an op-ed titled,”The Nobel Committee Got It Wrong: Ngugi wa Thiong’o Is The Writer The World Needs Now”. Penny for your thoughts?

Ngugi is an exceptional writer and his body of work is relevant for the modern time. That should truly be the criteria we adhere to. Dylan’s controversial award should progress the conversation forward by illuminating other works that have been left long neglected.

What is your definition of being “well-read”?

Having a diverse omnibus of reading interests both in terms of genre but as well as other literary works such as poetry.

Is there a book (or books) that you are constantly referring to or that you have gifted your friends or family over and over again?

A Thousand Splendid Suns, A Man of the People and 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

unsplash_dlaw_khosseini

Fill in the blank: If I could read in a foreign language:

A Hundred Years of Solitude or Don Quixote

Apart from reading, how else do you recharge your batteries?

Hiking and Biking

Please share your favourite quote from one of your favourite books.

“Miriam wished for so much in those final moments. Yet as she closed her eyes, it was not regret any longer but a sensation of abundant peace that washed over her. She thought of her entry into this world, the harami child of a lowly villager, an unintended thing, a pitiable, regrettable accident. A weed. And yet she was leaving the world as a woman who had loved and been loved back. She was leaving it as a friend, a companion, a guardian. A mother. A person of consequence at last. No. It was not so bad, Miriam thought, that she should die this way. Not so bad. This was a legitimate end to a life of illegitimate belongings.” ― Khaled Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns

Where can people find your bookish musings?

Blog: https://afronomad.wordpress.com/

Thanks  Eric!

 

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